First, this post was written to spark conversation (boy, has it!)

Second, this was written by someone (me) who is not a scientist and has not been studying this subject for years. I know there are downsides to GE foods, but I wanted to explore the positive side for once. For further information on my point of view, read my replies to comments below.

A good article on GE food can be found here, at Organic Gardening.

OK, here is the original post:

I don’t see what all the bother is about genetically engineered food.

There, I said it.     

Many people get all up in arms about GE or GMO food but they are usually ignorant of many of the facts. And did you know, food can be organic and GE at the same time? My main reason for saying this is that most people fear what they don’t understand. They think that just because we are changing genes around, it is automatically unnatural. Well guess what, farmers have been doing that for hundreds of years. It’s called plant breeding. You take a plant with a trait you like (say, drought resistance), and another plant with another trait you like (tasty) and you breed them together and hopefully one of the resulting plants will have both traits. But this takes time. Basically all genetic engineering does is speed up the process of breeding by taking the gene responsible for the drought resistance and splicing it directly into the other plant so we know for certain that all the new plants will have that trait.

(photo by John Doebley)

This is a good example of plant breeding as it has been done throughout history. The plant on the left is Teosinte ( Tripsacum) which is the plant that has been bred over the centuries to eventually lead us to the modern corn we have today. (quick post on Maize here) This is definitely genetic modification but it took a long time to figure out which way to breed them to get bigger, sweeter, more kernels, etc. Genetic engineering just saves us time because it allows us to isolate the exact trait we want instead of hoping it gets transfered when we cross pollinate two similar breeds.

The other reason I think more farmers should use GE seeds is that there are genetic solutions for pests and disease resistance that would mean that farmers would be able to decrease or eliminate their use of pesticides and herbicides. Many people think GE food is dangerous but there have been no cases of sickness or death and some GE foods have been around for years. However there are hundreds of deaths and sicknesses from fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides every year. Not to mention what they do to the ground water.

Some people are worried about pollen and genetic drift from GE crops but that fact is that while some does happen, it would not run wild or create super weeds. Our crops have been domesticated for hundreds of years and would not be able to thrive outside of a well tended field. Even with some enhanced traits, our crops are wusses.

“Other people are worried about long term risks that we won’t see for years when it’s too late. Allan Mazur who is a sociologist at SU here in Syracuse came up with good criteria to determine true warnings from false alarms.

1. Warnings turned out to be more than twice as likely to be true if the first conspicuous source of the public warning was based on a report of scientific research produced at a recognized scientific institution. If the alarm was raised by a government agent or citizen advocacy group it was more likely to be false.

2. True warnings were less likely than false alarms to have sponsers with bias against the producer of the alleged hazard.

3. Warning appearing in the news partly because of their connection to earlier news stories were more often false than warnings reaching the news without a boost from collateral sources. (Mazur 2004)

As far as the safety of GE food is concerned:

1. The first public warning was from a citizen advocacy group about using bacteria to protect plant from frost. Nothing bad has happened since they used it.

2. Many sponsers of anti-GE protests dislike Monsanto who owns many of the seeds and are worried about control. But this has nothing to do with the safety of actually eating the food.

3. Many of the warning coincided with outbreaks of other food safety problems in other parts of the world like Mad-Cow disease in he UK which has nothing to do with GE food. But this shook the confidence in regulatory agencies.

All three of these are typical false alarms.” (Tomorrow’s Table)

Most of this post was inspired by a great book I just read titled “Tomorrow’s Table” Organic farming, genetics, and the future of food. By Pamela C. Ronald and Raoul W. Adamchak. They are a husband and wife where she is a geneticist and he is and organic farmer. They try and reconcile the two disciplines and provide a lot of useful information. If you are interested in this subject, check it out.

Here’s an Anti- GMO link, for all you haters out there.

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Comments
  1. alpinmack says:

    exuvia August 21, 2008 at 11:29 am Edit

    For or against, Love and hate,
    ignorance works for both. If you like “ignorance is bliss”. For now no body knows, as in knowing, and we make assessments of events.

    I THINK it is unnatural to tamper with genes THEREFORE I AM against it. YOU THINK it isn’t THEREFORE YOU ARE for it; but you are mistaken about plant breeding; to look, like and choose what Nature does is a far shot from us poking around in the code – Book, if you like that metaphor – of Life. That is Nature, that is us, this, that, this, that… So I cannot share your statistical short cut to decide on True-false.

    Let us think deeper than deep before we rush in where angels fear to…

    I see you like the Bible and take it you wouldn’t want any one to fiddle with the letters in Gods Word before next print? Supposedly God spoke the World as is so what’s with us changing the text?

  2. exuvia says:

    Sorry about posting to ‘about’, thank you for putting things in the right place.

    Exuvia

  3. alpinmack says:

    Exuvia, I am moving your post since you posted the above in the “about” section rather than here.
    You have an interesting view. And you are right. I do believe in God and I believe he created this world and everything it it. When He said to take dominion over the world wouldn’t that include bending plants to our will? Using genetics is not unnatural since God invented them in the first place.I am also thinking that maybe you don’t understand plant breeding that well because it achieves the same purpose as genetic engineering but takes longer and is sloppier. When you combine two different plant of the same species like rice for example, you cross pollinate them and this leads to genetic modification. But this is “ok” and “natural” because people have been doing this since before Jesus walked the earth. But like I said, it’s sloppy. You exchange vast amounts of genetic code hoping to capture the one trait you were looking for. When you do it with today’s modern methods, you only change the one gene, not thousands. So the resulting plant is mostly unchanged except for the desired characteristic.

    Anyway, that is just my slightly informed opinion and you are welcome to yours. Thank you for your thoughts and may God bless whatever you choose to eat.

  4. exuvia says:

    I think he told us to eat what He – emphasis on He – had put on tree, stalk and bush.

    To bend the world or not to bend the world to our fancy? Depends doesn’t it. There is plenty of bending that came out wrong. Maybe we shouldn’t bend everything we can bend. Maybe we should bend without dishonoring our earthen mother and our heavenly Father. That’s the idea I get from the book on stone

    I’m sure I don’t understand many things like others understand them. Pollination is a no brainer, bees can do it, but there is a stretch from pollination to genetic manipulation

    We could let God bless the food we eat what ever it might be, but we could also acknowledge our image and likeness and see the world the way he saw it when it was FINISHED; and he saw that it was GOOD!

    Regards
    Exuvia

  5. exuvia says:

    there I went again

  6. exuvia says:

    If He finished creation on the seventh day, to use that metaphor, and it was GOOD AS WAS, are we not becoming demiurges, clay in rebellion, by opening Pandora’s Box? I think we overstep our boundaries again and risk further exile. When we split atoms, move around with genetics in seed and ovum we compete with the first Cause. Are we even smart enough to span the chain of consequence with our limited vision? We walk in darkness according to the Bible. I love science, fascinating stuff but I love ethics even more; humanistic, Christian, Buddhist, anything ethical or right.

  7. alpinmack says:

    “I’m sure I don’t understand many things like others understand them. Pollination is a no brainer, bees can do it, but there is a stretch from pollination to genetic manipulation”

    pollination IS genetic manipulation. Just like when we have kids. My genes mix with my wife’s genes and Viole` our child has a mix of both. Genetic manipulation.

    And yes when God finished, it was good. But after Adam, it is a fallen world. I guess I was just thinking of the practical application of science and how it could save millions of lives but not the ethical implications of it. But now here’s a question. If we have the means to save so many people by offering them crops that can survive floods, disease, pests, etc. and we don’t use that technology to save them, is that ethical to just let them die?

  8. exuvia says:

    Technology should be used to save lives. No standing around and watching; I agree with you there. But not any kind of technology; sometimes the remedy is worse than the illness. In this case we do not know. Let’s change our habits – first things first – before we do surgery with unforeseeable consequences to the eco system. There are ways but no will to distribute the food on our planet. Amino acid mining does not have to be focused on animals; the vegetable kingdom is a reign of plenty. The very need which seems to merit our new creations has partly resulted from the eating habits responsible for amongst other things the obesity forecast: aprox. 100 % of all Americans in 20 years, if nothing changes. We are our own worst enemies and push away responsibility. We would rather change Nature than change our own selves. We should get up after the fall not pass on the tab. We fell, remember, not the world; the apple tree and the stalk of wheat is not to blame. We became the thorn in the eye, Nature is beautiful; as was and as is.

    Nature could be around for eternity and it would still not come up with our creations. We break the mold. That is how unnatural it is.

    Everything is permitted but not everything is convenient: “All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but all things edify not”

  9. alpinmack says:

    Oooo good one.1 Corinthians 6:12. really, not sarcastically. Yes, there are many other things we can do to help besides that. This is just one way and I wanted to talk about it. I had not heard of that obesity statistic but if I have my way, it will be 99.9999998% because I won’t get fat. I like to stay active will not allow myself to become sedentary. In fact, I am going up to the Adirondack Mountains this weekend and am planning on climbing one. Plus frisbee, volleyball, I maight even bring my kayak. But maybe not because of the wind resistance it will produce on top of the car. I’m trying to save gas you see. This is a good little debate we have going here. Cheers.

  10. exuvia says:

    Cheers to you too,

    we had a power outing and the neighbors alarm system would go on then off then on then off and… now electricity and modern comfort is back.

    I have enjoyed sharing ideas with you on this difficult and crucial topic and have vowed to eliminate any misunderstanding I might harbor as to your insistence that what Nature does is what men do. I still believe that Natures mind is closer to Gods mind than the abysmal darkness of the human mind is to the Light and that mankind has a tendency to reach towards the forbidden fruits of knowledge he acquires whilst in the way through “this adventure called Life”. Smile

    Fare well in the mountains and enjoy; sounds great and promising.

    Maybe I shall see you some time on my own page: http://www.exuvia.wordpress.com

    Kind regards
    Exuvia

  11. drcorner says:

    IMO, while there are many arguments that can be made for both sides of Genetic Engineering (both Pro and Con), I feel that these are the two most important things to consider:

    1. Genetically Engineered foods are a HUGE HUGE benefit to third-world and poor countries who cannot afford the luxuries of growing green food, or obtain green food (at least not until the price of organic and greener foods drops significantly). Remove genetically engineered foods altogether and you’ve just doomed/condemned. about 2/3rds of the world’s population. (Pro)

    2. That being said, it’s also important to always keep in your nearby thoughts that it’s evolution of food that enables it to survive. Plants adapt to diseases, insects, and climate changes…that adaptation allows it diversify into a better product. Us doing the job for them, will sometimes produce a weaker plant/animal that when re-introduced to the wild (and natural phenomenon), will most likely perish. Do we really want to always take that risk with our food-supply? (Con)

  12. Tamal says:

    Your article is outstanding. Yes I agree to whatever you said. Genetic engineering is fastening of plant breeding and with additional features of selectivity. It’s that simple. You will be glad to know researchers in UT Medical School, Houston have done genetic modification by which a banana can smell like an apple. This sounds irrelevant, but it could make foods naturally pest resistant. So no more biomagnification of fertilisers and pesticides.

  13. alpinmack says:

    Thank you Tamal. Although I’m not sure if I would want my banana smelling like an apple. Maybe if it was only in the pheromones and not what my nose could detect then it would be ok. So the bugs are confused but my nose isn’t.

    And Dr. Corner, your Con supports my argument that we don’t have to be afraid of GE food going crazy and spreading to the wild precisely because of what you said. This is also the focus of a chapter in “Tomorrow’s Table”

  14. Acai Plus says:

    Nice blog you have here. I pretty much lurk the internet when I’m bored and read all I can about the organic lifestyle, but I really liked you view on things. I’ll bookmark the site and subscribe to the feed!

  15. exuvia says:

    If we can make bananas smell like apples that is an act of great scientific prowess which may or may not contribute to progress. The evolution of knowledge, and the power we derive from it, is only a part when compared to the ‘whole’ of Life.

    Lately I have been looking into the differences between ‘power’ and ‘authority’; the philosophical nuances in that are of great importance when considering an act. The little trick of changing the natural fragrance of a fruit is an extremely potent expression of ‘power’. We can shape our environment at will. But is it convenient to confuse a monkey; intelligent or not?

    Our culture already shares designer water; fizzy dark glucose, phosphoric acid and caffeine rich substitutes to real water, what about blue tomatoes and bananas smelling like apples. The human freak show is ready to hit the road. We can make this psychedelic. “We won’t!” you might say. “Ok”, I’ll reply; “you have a lot of faith in human ethics”; up until now we, as a specie, have done everything possible, everything in our ‘power’. Why would we stop short this time? Where there is a way there is someone willing to go that way…

    Greetings,
    Exuvia

  16. Shmertis shore says:

    F*#%ing republicans trying to hood wink us with there “RELIGION” its bull sh%t i love drought resistant corn. Question :This is going to sound stupid, But Can i possibly breed a Marijuana plant with any other form of plant life? Like Cotton. Cause that would make some strong ass rope. Hempton?!

  17. alpinmack says:

    Yeah you could. With GE you could take the specific characteristic that makes cotton so strong and add it to the cannabis genome. I think I’ll stick with my modern climbing rope though.

  18. Savethe world says:

    I think that GMO foods are really bad.

  19. Savethe world says:

    A genetically modified organism (GMO) is a plant, animal or microorganism whose genetic code has been altered, subtracted, or added (either from the same species or a different species) in order to give it characteristics that it does not have naturally.Most plants produce substances that are toxic to humans. Most of the plants that humans consume produce toxins at levels low enough that they do not produce any adverse health effects. There is concern that inserting an exotic gene into a plant could cause it to produce toxins at higher levels that could be dangerous to humans. This could happen through the process of inserting the gene into the plant. If other genes in the plant become damaged during the insertion process it could cause the plant to alter its production of toxins. Alternatively, the new gene could interfere with a metabolic pathway causing a stressed plant to produce more toxins in response. Although these effects have not been observed in GM plants, they have been observed through conventional breeding methods creating a safety concern for GM plants. For example, potatoes conventionally bred for increased diseased resistance have produced higher levels of glycoalkaloids.

    Decreased Nutritional Value: A genetically modified plant could theoretically have lower nutritional quality than its traditional counterpart by making nutrients unavailable or indigestible to humans. For example, phytate is a compound common in seeds and grains that binds with minerals and makes them unavailable to humans. An inserted gene could cause a plant to produce higher levels of phytate decreasing the mineral nutritional value of the plant. Another example comes from a study showing that a strain of genetically modified soybean produced lower levels of phytoestrogen compounds, believed to protect against heart disease and cancer, than traditional soybeans.

    I think that GE foods should be labeled, so that people like me who don’t want to eat genetically engineered products can stay away from them.

  20. alpinmack says:

    Thank you for your well thought out comments. I always welcome differing viewpoints. I am not an expert on the subject by any means, those are just my views. I do think they should be labeled so people can have a choice. Thanks.

  21. exuvia says:

    Selection is fine with me, natural or human; let’s choose the best. It’s the engineering, the human design, which causes me concern beyond remedy. Yes, It’s a small change in the genetic makeup, but it could be a giant step towards an unforeseen chain reaction. Small errors in the beginning can lead to great mistakes in the end. I like natures way; let Her make the mistakes.

  22. Yanik says:

    http://joejack.livejournal.com/34426.html

    My rebuttal.

    Counter Snark To Pro-GMO Feller
    https://alpinmack.wordpress.com/2008/08/21/geneticlly-engineered-food/

    Many people get all up in arms about GE or GMO food but they are usually ignorant of many of the facts. And did you know, food can be organic and GE at the same time? My main reason for saying this is that most people fear what they don’t understand. They think that just because we are changing genes around, it is automatically unnatural. Well guess what, farmers have been doing that for hundreds of years. It’s called plant breeding.

    This person is probably being an —— for calling anti GMO people ignorant. I understand genetics very well, and I understand farming very well, and being part of a farming culture, fighting for my rights, well, I know what I’m talking about. I might not be “educated” but I am pretty damn well educated. The core of all of my understanding of everything comes from a knowledge of evolution and although I am not completely anti-biotech, I am for the most part when it’s usually developed completely in the interest of economy. Sure, it takes longer. It took us several thousands of years, not the hundreds this fella stated above. Who’s ignorant?

    Sure your brain has to be grossly engorged with modern science to do it the newschool way, but you’ve got to work pretty hard and think double hard to breed plants, and some of the process can take several generations of a family up to get where it gets. There is nothing at all wrong with hard work, which is something farming has taught me directly. The breeding of plants was written into our culture since possibly far back as the end of the neolithic, quite a few thousands of years ago. People want a quick answer, quick product and forget about process, and the inherent merits of being involved in a slow, fruitful process, which is the spiritual sickness of our species. I tend to view Humans farming plants as a symbiosis on an evolutionary and biological basis, not just something we do to get what we want.

    2. Many sponsers of anti-GE protests dislike Monsanto who owns many of the seeds and are worried about control. But this has nothing to do with the safety of actually eating the food.

    It’s not so much the dangers of just eating the food. With Monsanto, it owns the patents to the seeds it has bred. People are prohibited from growing their stuff unless given the okay, but seeds move and volunteer into peoples’ fields who didn’t plant them. Because of the intillectual property on seeds, which are usually GMO, since nobody really owns (or can own) the rights to heirloom seeds, all sorts of legal issues arise when people want to grow or breed other varieties close to patented ones, to the point where it becomes almost more practical for farmers to choose patented seed. The now infamous case of Percy Schmeiser V.S. Monsanto illustrates this, and doesn’t so much have to do with big businesses who are threatened by Monsanto so much as an indivdual’s rights being threatened by Monsanto.

    The Crop in question here is Roundup Ready Canola. It was engineered to withstand the effects of glyphosate, or Roundup, a herbicide product wich monsanto developed and held the rights to at the time. Glyphosate is pretty damn toxic to lots of plants, and many species of plant had to be engineered to handle it. As such, it’s damaging to members of the ecosystem.

    The other reason I think more farmers should use GE seeds is that there are genetic solutions for pests and disease resistance that would mean that farmers would be able to decrease or eliminate their use of pesticides and herbicides. Many people think GE food is dangerous but there have been no cases of sickness or death and some GE foods have been around for years. However there are hundreds of deaths and sicknesses from fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides every year. Not to mention what they do to the ground water.

    And I quote again: But this has nothing to do with the safety of actually eating the food. Um, there are a lot of things in the world other than people who need to eat, and glyphosate destroys their food source. Humano-centrism strikes again. What’s more is that many of the “weeds” we kill are actually valid, nutritious and often tasty food sources themselves, a few examples being amaranth, dandelion, various chenopodiums, many of which are even cultivated in parts of the world, plantain (plantago not the big banana like thingys)… the list goes on (and on). In my garden, I can lure known pests off of cultivated plants by leaving in certain weeds in certain places, knowing that certain pests prefer them, then pulling them later instead of pulling every single weed I see. My knowledge of nature and environment makes it so that myself, my food and the native plants in my garden are inseperable. We all form part of a system, and as such our interests are just as valid as an ant’s, a bee’s, lettuce or lettuce root aphids’. We were manging pests a long time before we were even capable of using the most rudimentary chemical control. Monsanto, and other biotech firms interests are counter evolutionary, because they attempt to usurp many thousands of years of co-evolution between plants and people, attempting a monopoly on something that should be the right of every Human being. It takes a member of an educated elite to modify a gene using technology. Everyday people with a little bit of dirt in their yard can breed plants.

    Some people are worried about pollen and genetic drift from GE crops but that fact is that while some does happen, it would not run wild or create super weeds. Our crops have been domesticated for hundreds of years and would not be able to thrive outside of a well tended field. Even with some enhanced traits, our crops are wusses.

    Um, the amount of cultivated plants that escape into the wild is alarming. It’s actually a major environmental issue in the Americas and Australasia. This person really doesn’t know their plants. Ignorant what?

    Monoculture is dangerous. It’s a relatively new development in our society, and coincides with rapid urbanization. People who own farms don’t live on farms, and large amounts of single crops or limited selections of crops are farmed on the same piece of land to sell often to a single large broker. Subsistence becomes less of a concern, and lots of stuff is shipped away and exported. If you grow a large plot of a single crop, organic culture becomes difficult, the chances of harmful pests increases, and genetically engineering food to handle chemical culture becomes more needed (I won’t use the term necessary). Economy, and urbano-centrism is what is to blame. A bold statement, but one I am making, because I see it.

    But this person really has no right to make so many boldly general statements on the topic, much less call others ignorant when they clearly aren’t aware of a lot of the facts themself.

    It makes me happy that there is a fairly strong international movement to protect farmers’ rights from this kind of stuff though, with lots of seed banks, organizations like Navdanya International and all that. I’m less than pessimistic. But this person made me a little mad, runnin’ them a mout’ like that, with such poor backup. I tend to think this sort of ignorance to facts about agriculture comes from a lack of looking at agriculture, a lack of concern with agriculture which can be attributed to the relatively recent urbanization of many developed nations, Canada and the U.S. being two of them that I can say I know about.

  23. alpinmack says:

    Yanik,
    I posted your rebuttal here so others could see it since you didn’t have the balls to do it yourself. I appreciate your reply but not your tone. When I said many poeple are ignorant of the facts, I did not say ALL. Clearly you are someone who is educated in this issue. If you read my other replies:

    “Anyway, that is just my slightly informed opinion and you are welcome to yours. Thank you for your thoughts and may God bless whatever you choose to eat.”

    I don’t claim to be an expert. I read a good book and wanted to write a post about what I learned. If you have real problems with my statements, take it up with the authors. Good day to you.

  24. Sally W says:

    Hi everyone. I have been tring to find what this type of corn is and found this picture of Teosinte ( Tripsacum) T the top of this page . it is very cool and very old and would like to find someone that knows more about it. I am holding it in my hand and stil can’t belive that this was how corn use to be. HELP!!! I can send a picture of this If is can get some info on it. Sally

  25. philippem34 says:

    This subject is very tricky indeed.

    And I have to disagree with your general view on the subject. True, there has been no evidence of deaths etc… but this does not make it safe. The thing is this has been approved too quickly and too carelessly. It may be OK, but we do not know ! and corporate interests took over too strongly and that’s unacceptable.

    I suggest you watch a very interesting documentary called THE WORLD ACCORDING TO MONSANTO.
    it will expose many facets of this subject and shed light on some tyrrannical stereotypes that were established.

  26. alpinmack says:

    Thanks for your comment. I don’t profess to know everything about the subject, and I agree that some aspects of the technology have moved quickly, but on a general, down to basics idea, I like the idea of genetically modified food. This might be what feeds the world hungry someday. I know, I’m too optimistic, and blind to the realities of how the world works, but the general idea is good.

    I guess I’m future minded like that, reading too much science-fiction. I would love to have nano-bots in my bloodstream that searched out cancer, a computer laced throughout my brain, and many other modifications, not just to my food.

  27. Anonymous says:

    trust me, watch that film.
    it’s not released on dvd in the states (for shady reasons) but it’s been acclaimed everywhere. I live in canada.

    you can stream it here: http://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/2008/04/01/the-world-according-to-monsanto-a-documentary-that-americans-wont-ever-see-full-video/

  28. exuvia says:

    “I would love to have nano-bots in my bloodstream that searched out cancer, a computer laced throughout my brain, and many other modifications”

    Do not despair, it shall soon enough come; whether we like it or not.

    I personally think Nature is the greatest invention ever; ever, ever, ever…

    Humans have some severe talent but are also flawed with many mistakes. I wish we would keep to our own business and broaden our minds without tampering with the very fabric which brought us forth. My wish is not likely to come true though, judging by things; still, I won’t let it happen without a say.

    Reason and emotion are serious contenders to Love. Say that I am romantic but I will go with Love… and Nature.

    The day man has become a chip off of the old hard drive, Nature may be a memory; on a stick.

    Greetings
    Exuvia

  29. exuvia says:

    We may end up leaving our own lament; the weeping and gnashing of our teeth, on a silicone chip to be found by possible aliens. A warning to other possible civilizations, a last act of human grandeur before his flesh is irreversible turned to radioactive dust with no life to bring forth another body.

    We should head down Nature’s path before it becomes impossible. Put technology road on hold while we assure the survival of the species. Let not robots be the fittest.

    Monsanto’s suicide gene technology will sow death not life on earth. Sterile seed can no more produce offspring than a sterile woman. But that is where the gold lies. Economic control at our food source. All power taken away from the farmers. You end up on a contract and not in the hands of God and care.

    Exuvia

  30. exuvia says:

    In the hands of men technological prowess may some times be turned into technological stupidity; in times of war atom splitting is used to wipe out other human beings.

    Since Cain grabbed the first tool he could find to kill his brother the story has had a tendency to repeat it self. Some men are willing to relinquish power; many are not. Give them power and they will use it to their end.

    Exuvia

  31. alpinmack says:

    Thank you Anonymous for that healthy dose of opposition. That is a scary film. (yes, I watched the whole thing) and while I might have to rewrite some parts of my post, I still believe GE foods are OK (in theory, we need to improve the Practice part). The movie Slams Monsanto, but much of it talks about how bad the corp. is and not GE foods in general. PCB, rGBH, Dioxin, and seed patents take up a lot of the movie time. Still, it was very well done and thoroughly researched. Thanks for the link. I encourage everyone to see it if you have a spare two hours. This issue isn’t as clear cut as I thought it was and I need to do more research.

  32. Jayabta says:

    I like the spermicidal corn the best it will help reduce the population explosion.

  33. Noctys says:

    Actually, there is nothing more natural than playing with genes: Nature does it all the time, the problem being when her experiment goes wrong, beings die or suffer.
    What worries me is not the technique or the knowledge in itself but the greed hiding behind good intentions, the will of control under the veil of benefit for mankind. Not everything must be for our benefit only btw, because neither Nature nor the Universe is, in spite of what a lot of religions think and preach.
    I worry more about lobbies and companies copyrighting the very fabric of life, claiming to have a right of property just because they “invented” it. Well they did not: they found it out, they understood it but that’s all. And please, cut the crap over the costs and expenses! So far, besides corn for farming animals and a few failed attempts of correcting Nature’s mistakes, which results have these technologies brought us, except a lot of paperwork, talking and hazard?

  34. […] The busiest day of the year was May 5th with 159 views. The most popular post that day was Genetically engineered food. […]

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